ED4E734C-D8CE-4774-BC54-817FCB89FBFCWhen it comes to journalism and media, we’re often taught that our thoughts and opinions aren’t as significant. We’re here to tell other people’s stories. Following that logic, it shouldn’t really matter who tells these stories, right?

Not really.

The people telling stories have an inescapable effect on how those stories are told. In February of 2013, only 19 percent of sources quoted in newspaper articles were women.

That’s not very surprising when you look at who’s working in newsrooms. We as people tend to seek out people we identify with to talk to. In 2013, only 37.2 percent of journalists were women. And only four of eight top online news outlets had women in major editing roles.

Those numbers are changing, but not fast enough. If we want to see more diversity in our news stories, we need to see more diversity in our newsrooms. Every new voice in a newsroom or media position is unique and brings important insight to the stories they create.

Mizzou Women in Media wants to celebrate those individual voices and acknowledge how important they are. That’s why we’ve started the My Voice campaign. We’ll be posting content that looks at how every voice can contribute to better journalism.

We invite you to join us. Tweet, Instagram and post at #MyVoiceBC and tell us why your voice matters. We start today.

If you want to make your own of our sign, you can download our template here.